Rule Iterations and Subject Reflection

Continuing from last weeks blog where I identified changes that needed to be made to my game rules, such as adding in a paragraph describing the game and it’s concept. I have developed a final iteration of the rules in preparation for the final game dossier, this includes the descriptive paragraph as well as revitalised game rules.

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A game components sheet that helped inspire my rule iteration

Game Description: ‘Welcome to Hypebeast Fashion Match, a card game where you can unleash your inner hypebeast and create the craziest outfits possible without any of the usual financial and logistical limitations. Enjoy clothing from brands like Supreme, Yeezy, Raf Simons and more! as you match your tops, bottoms, shoes and accessories to beat the outfits of your opponent and become the ultimate hypebeast.

Game Structure: Hypebeast Fashion Match includes a round based system to decide on which player is the ‘outfit judge’, the player who determines the best outfit during each round. The outfit judge does not participate in the round until the end when they determine the best outfit. The remaining players participate by matching 4 of their cards (1 top, 1 bottom, 1 shoe, 1 accessory) to create the best outfit they can. The outfit judge has full discretion on how they select the round winner. They may consider, but are not limited to things such as item value, level of hype, brand stacking and overall outfit flow when making their decision. The first player to reach a total of 5 round wins will win the game overall.

Components:
– ‘Tops’ Cards x30
– ‘Bottoms’ Cards x30
– ‘Shoes’ Cards x30
– ‘Accessories’ Cards x30
– ‘Plain T-Shirt’ Cards (Double Sided) x6

Setup:
– Separate all cards into their separate piles of 30 (tops, bottoms, shoes and accessories)
– Each player selects 4 cards from each pile (starting with the eldest player)
– Provide each player with one double sided plain t shirt card, return any remaining cards to the box

Gameplay:
– The eldest player begins the game as the outfit judge, they will not participate in creating an outfit this round
– All remaining players must play 1 card from each category to create an outfit
– The outfit judge will then select a round winner
– Players return the cards they used in that outfit to the deck and select 1 card from each category
– The player to the left of the outfit judge becomes the next outfit judge and this process repeats for the rest of the game
– First player to reach 5 round wins will win the game overall

Plain T-Shirt Cards:
– Each player is given 1 double sided plain t-shirt card at the beginning of the game
– The player is allowed to use this card when playing a card from the ‘tops’ deck that provides no indication of what is on underneath that top e.g. an open jacket, to help the outfit flow together
– If the card is used during the round the player does not return it to the deck, it is kept for the entirety of the game

To reflect on my overall experience during the subject ‘Game Making – BCM300‘, I have had the opportunity to hone many different skills and learn a variety of new topics. With board games being the primary focus of the subject, I was exposed to something new because I had never really thought about the development of board games as opposed to video games. The main thing I was able to take away from the subject was the importance of playtesting and iteration, a consistent theme in BCM subjects.

In addition, I was able to grasp the concept of abstraction in a much simpler way compared to a subject I have previously done that only vaguely covered the topic. Finally, I was able to create my own card game from scratch, something I never had thought I would or could do, I was also exposed to some pretty awesome board games, including some great ones created by my peers. I would like to thank the teaching staff Christopher Moore and Richard Hall for investing their time in the subject this semester.

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Playtesting Ray Nguyen‘s game with Eric Bunquin
Header image credit: Ray Nguyen

2 thoughts on “Rule Iterations and Subject Reflection

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